Fix to Try if WordPress Won’t Allow Comments

One of the my blogs stopped allowing comments. If you experience this is might be due to an issue with https. The blog in question was serving https pages and everything had been working previously. I am not sure when the issue first appeared, but I noticed it after updating to WordPress v 5.1.

When I looked at the page source I could see the comment form was trying to submit to http (even though it was being submitted from a https page). I received a message that the page was going to be submitted in an insecure manner and did I want to submit anyway. I said yes and a new page was loaded (though it was blank). But no comment was submitted to the wordpress database.

Using another browser it gave a 405 error.

This page isn’t working
If the problem continues, contact the site owner.

HTTP ERROR 405

I couldn’t figure out why it was submitting to http. I remembered there is a general settings page (/wp-admin/options-general.php) and I went there and noticed the

WordPress Address (URL)
and
Site Address (URL)

fields were set to http. I updated them to https and then everything worked fine.

Related: Compare WordPress Files on Server to Proper WordPress VersionFix for When a WordPress Blog Stops Displaying ImagesWordPress: Multiple Blog Network on One Server – Overcoming Conflicts

Fixing a Problem with WordPress Trackbacks and Pingbacks

Trackbacks and pingbacks stopped working on several of my blogs. It turned out to be quite time consuming figuring out what was causing the problem. Eventually the following worked:

Installing php-xml

sudo apt-get install php-xml

And commenting out a check for empty $context variable (this doesn’t really make sense as the variable isn’t empty at this point but until it was commented out it just silently didn’t work) in the file wp-includes/class-wp-xmlrpc-server.php.

// if ( empty($context) ) // Link to target not found
// return $this->pingback_error( 17, __( 'The source URL does not contain a link to the target URL, and so cannot be used as a source.' ) );

Anyway if the initial steps you take to deal when trackbacks and pingbacks on your blog stop working you might want to try these steps that worked for me.

Related: Fix for When a WordPress Blog Stops Displaying ImagesCompare WordPress Files on Server to Proper WordPress VersionWordPress: Multiple Blog Network on One Server – Overcoming Conflicts

How to Manually Run Cron Tasks

To manually run cron tasks you can use the run-parts command in Linux.

So to run your cron-weekly, for example, to test that a fix you just made runs without error (this is what I just did, in fact)

run-parts /etc/cron-weekly

run-parts will run all the executables in a directory (you must point at the directory). So if you have several files in cron-weekly to run, you can’t just point to one of the files.

You may run into environmental differences running the script as a different user than the cron test runs at, so you can run as that user if needed. You need to be aware this is a quick and simple way of testing part of the process but it doesn’t do a perfect job of testing if it works as a cron task. But it will let you catch some failures quickly and fix them in time for the actual cron task to run. So do check that the everything works after the real cron job runs.

This is just the kind of thing I said I would put in this blog. Simple stuff but things I forget – so I put it here to remember and maybe help out others, like me, that need really basic tips.

If you have a cron task item (or have setup the whole task this way) that is just a script and you just want to test that 1 item you may run the script directly. For example (for a Linux shell script):

sh /etc/cron.weekly/your_crontask_script.sh

Related: Updates Needed When Upgrading from Apache 2.2 to 2.4Rsync to copy Files Between Servers and ComputersBash Profile Adjustments for Scrolling HistoryChecklist: Setting Up a New Domain on VPS

Compare WordPress Files on Server to Proper WordPress Version

Sadly one of the hassles in managing your own WordPress blog is dealing with people that use your blog to serve spam content. These hacks can insert spam links into your pages and posts or create spam directories that are completely their own content on your domain.

There are many issues to deal with in re-establishing control of your server; but that isn’t the scope of this post.

This is just a tips if you are troubleshooting to try and determine what is going on. Often your server has been hacked to allow uploaded php pages to be added or for WordPress php files to be edited.

One way to track down if the files have been changed or new ones added is to compare the WordPress files on your server to the current files for a fresh WordPress install. This assumes your blog is using the current version, which hopefully it is because on the big improvement WordPress made is to make those updates automatic. That greatly reduces the chance to have WordPress be the vector to infecting your server. If you were using a older version then just compare to the field for that version from the WordPress server.

If you don’t have a current backup I would make a backup before I tried this. Obviously, don’t make any deletions or changes to your server unless you understand what you are doing. You can create big problems for yourself.

You can use the diff command to view the difference between WordPress on your sever and the fresh install from WordPress. I install the new WordPress in a new directory outside public_html. At the cli on a Ubuntu/Linux server:

sudo wget http://wordpress.org/wordpress-4.0.zip
unzip wordpress-4.0.zip
diff -rq wordpress ../public_html/

wordpress-4.0.zip – replace with whatever the version is you are using.
../public_html/blog/ – replace with the path to your blog

Continue reading

Zoom Level on Embedded umap OpenStreetMaps

Curious Cat uses OpenStreetMaps and umap to create my own maps. Then I can embed them on my sites, for example here for Chiang Mai Thailand.

For some reason when you use umap and select the embed option it gives you code that leaves off the zooming altogether. It is an easy fix (and I imagine the code will be fixed making this simple advice obsolete). But for now this is all you need to do.

The url umap adjusts as you zoom the map in your browswer. For example, going to

http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602

which the Curious Cat Chiang Mai map it will “redirect” to some really far out zoom level

http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602#6/18.719/99.657

Then you can zoom in a bunch to get the level you want to use to embed.

http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602#14/18.7851/98.9907

The code created for you to paste into your page is

<iframe width="100%" height="300px" frameBorder="0" src="http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602?scaleControl=false&miniMap=false&scrollWheelZoom=false&zoomControl=true&allowEdit=false&moreControl=true&datalayersControl=true&onLoadPanel=undefined"></iframe><p><a href="http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602">See full screen</a></p>

Which doesn’t include any zooming info so you get the super far our zoom default.

You need to add to the url

src="http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602

so that it includes the zooming info. So it would be

src="http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/chiang-mai_18602#14/18.7851/98.9907

You can also see the link to “See full screen” isn’t using the zoom settings. If you wanted that link to a zoom setting of your choice you can set that also.

Note the view on your screen and the embedded map isn’t going to be identical. The map will likely cut off some of what you see (due to the sizing of the embedded map). You can also adjust the sizing of the embedded map by adjusting the height (they default to 300px, but you can make it 400px or whatever you want).

Related: Multiple WordPress Blog Networks on One Server – Overcoming ConflictsChecklist for Setting Up a New Domain on VPSLinux/Ubuntu File and Directory Permissions

How to Dump SQL Result to a Text File Using cli

Just a quick tip on how to dump a sql result to a txt file.

mysql -e “select * from [table]” -u[user] -p [database] > sqlresult.txt

For example:

mysql -e "select * from orders where product_id = 15" -uroot -p  > sqlresult.txt

Related: Some MySQL cli Syntax ExamplesBasic MySQL Performance MonitoringMySQL Performance Tuning Tips

Updates Needed When Upgrading from Apache 2.2 to 2.4

I updated from Ubuntu 12.04 to Ubuntu 14.04 on a virtual private server.

When you do that update, Apache is updated from 2.2 to 2.4. Certain changes mean that until you update the site-available configuration files no web sites will work.

The quick checklist of what you have to do for each configuration

  1. update the file to add or edit the directory details (where /var/www/curiouscatnetwork.com/public_html/ is the path to the website files on your server)
    <Directory /var/www/curiouscatnetwork.com/public_html/>
       Require all granted
    </Directory>

    Remember if you have details needed for WordPress those instructions need to remain. I didn’t have a Directory area listed on my non-Wordpress sites.

  2. The files now need a .conf extension so move the rename/move the files to the new name
    sudo mv curiouscatnetwork.com curiouscatnetwork.com.conf
  3. Enable the new configuration
    sudo a2ensite curiouscatnetwork.com.conf
  4. Reload apache to reload the new configuration
    sudo service apache2 reload

More details from Linode.

The upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS was interrupted (I quit a window using the wrong command – oops). Luckily it wasn’t a big deal. I was able to delete the lock file.

sudo rm /var/lib/dpkg/lock

Then trying to update again

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

gave a message telling me what command to use to have the upgrade continue.

sudo dpkg --configure -a

which seemed to work fine.

Related: Bash Profile Adjustments, Scrolling HistoryChecklist: Setting Up a New Domain on VPSModSecurity: Adjustments for WordPress

Reset Root Password on MySQL Database

How to reset the root password on a MySQL database.

Stop mysql using this command:

sudo /etc/init.d/mysql stop

Because you are not checking user privledges at this point, it’s safest to disable networking. Then, start the mysqld demon process using the –skip-grant-tables option using

sudo /usr/sbin/mysqld --skip-grant-tables --skip-networking &

Next, start the mysql client process using this command:

mysql -u root

from the mysql prompt execute this command to be able to change any password

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Then reset/update your password

SET PASSWORD FOR root@'localhost' = PASSWORD('password');

Related: Turn It Off and On Again (WordPress Loses Database Connection)Some MySQL cli syntax examplesKeeping Your Hosted Ubuntu Web Server Software Up to Date

Fix for When a WordPress Blog Stops Displaying Images

My WordPress network site stopped displaying uploaded images. I finally found something that works, though it is a lame “solution” in my opinion.

I found this advice and it worked for me. Insert the following in wp-includes/ms-files.php

adding ob_clean() before the readfile in ms-files.php

So you end up with:

// If we made it this far, just serve the file
ob_clean();
readfile( $file );
?>

Caching seemed to make the images “disappear” slowly (they didn’t all go at once and using different browsers they “disappeared” at different times). So when I fixed it they “reappeared” at different times (it seemed like cached ones stayed disappeared for awhile).

The advice mentions the image files being seen as “corrupted.” The files seem unlikely to actually be “corrupt” because these are images that worked for years and then all of a sudden every image for the sites “disappeared” (wouldn’t be displayed). I suppose it is possible the are corrupt in some detailed way and some update no longer allowed some previous “lax” checking to allow the non-compliant files but it seems more likely that some of thing has gone wrong (but somehow ob_clean takes care of it).

Related: WordPress error: Image could not be processed. Please go back and try again.Overcoming Conflicts Multiple Blog WordPress Network on One ServerBash Profile Adjustments, Scrolling History

Rsync to copy Files Between Servers and Computers

I found rsync when I wanted to use scp to copy files to a server but not overwrite files already there. Rsync is actually more efficient no matter what (it seems) but it is really great if there are a bunch of duplicate files (Rsync will just skip them).

To copy files from your current computer to a server:

rsync -azv -r ssh [directory] [username]@remotehost:[location]

$ sudo rsync -azv -e ssh directory-on-my-computer/ john@example.com:~/files/go/here

a = archive mode
z = compress file data
v = verbose
r = recurse through subdirectories and copy all of them

Compressing file data saves bandwidth so if that is an issue it is another big win over scp. And in my reading it seems rsync can restart a broken file transfer in process (while scp you have to redo the whole file transfer).

To copy from the server to your computer just reverse the order of the locations. And you can even just put in two addresses not on your current computer and copy between then.

As a reminder, I realize this blog is made up of stuff that is obvious to a large number of people. It is really aimed at me (so I can quickly find what I found before), and to a lessor extent others like me (who use cli some but are not system administrators or programmers to any significant extent).

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